Thursday, 24 February 2011

Lucky me, Hut 13!

Above: Hut 13, 13 Morey St Armadale. Isn't it beautiful? Formerly Sanders & King, to my mind it's not only a worthy successor, for a colour lover like me it's even better!
Above: And what's this inside? Beautiful prints by Inaluxe, and a clock that looks extremely familiar! Those mirrors on the right look kind of familiar as well....
Above: Some more familiar friends nestled among pretty William Morris-style plates from Shanghai as well as decoration by co-owner Lucy Mora around the window.
Above: Handmade plates from South Africa (I really need that scallop-edged one with the bird), pretty handmade embroidered and beaded necklaces by Lucy, as well as delicate glass toadstool and bird house pendants by Sarah Dingwall.
Above: A Guatemalan rabbit like lovely from Ceiba Tree.
Above: And last but not least, toadstool and rabbit lamps from France.

I am very proud to have my work in such a beautiful shop, and among such specially chosen friends, large and small. It has been wonderful to meet and chat with Lucy (do visit -- she and her puppy Digby will make you very welcome). Besides being almost-neighbours, we have one important thing in common: we have both designed prints for the children's brand Seed! I think that is quite a coincidence. Or maybe not?

Saturday, 19 February 2011

The wonderful Ginger Riley

above: Nyamiyukanji, the river country, 1997
above: Ngak Ngak in Limmen Bight country, 1995
above: Limmen Bight story, 1987
above: Ngak Ngak, 1987
above: Ngak Ngak, sea eagle, 1988
above: Football, the wet and Limmen Bight country, 1996

All by the wonderful Ginger Riley Munduwalalawala (c.1937 - 2002), Australian Aboriginal artist from the Gulf country of the Northern Territory. When I grow up, I want to be able to own artwork half as beautiful as his.

This week I have been a card making machine again! I am very proud to announce that my cards and other paper goods will be available at William Topp in Perth; and my cards will be in Melbourne at Shop Sui in Fitzroy, Five Boroughs in East Brunswick, and The Local Shop in Northcote.

I am also taking part in the Poppytalk Affordable Art and Homewares Online Market this month: in excellent company I might add!

Wednesday, 16 February 2011

A fashion drawing

I have made an attempt at a fashion drawing, as I felt that I needed one in my illustration portfolio. Not sure that it's suitable. Fashion Drawing No.1: Mojave Indian Doll Wearing Basile, Spring/Summer 1982.

Meanwhile, I have been a card making machine again. I am proud to announce that my cards will shortly be available at Lamington in Noosa! Lucky cards! Wish I could go with them.

Saturday, 12 February 2011

An interesting commission

My ex-colleague Alasdair, who is these days behind the clever Otto & Spike label, commissioned me to make a wedding present for his friends. Not a conventional portrait, it's rather a pair of characters representing the couple's various interests. I forgot to photograph them on their stands before I handed them over, so here are some sketches and scans of the finished pieces. I hope they like them, I enjoyed making them!

Wednesday, 9 February 2011

Middle Eastern Inspiration

I love the play on western and eastern painting styles in these images from Islamic Art by Barbara Brend, London, 1991. Above: Portrait of Shahzadeh Ali Quli Mirza by Yusuf in the Qajar style 1280/ 1863. "The prince was the Minister for Science, Commerce and the Arts," writes Brend. A fittingly rich context.
Above: I call this little lady the Frida Kahlo of the east. A portrait of an acrobat, it is painted in oil, shaped to fit a wall niche. (She can be seen in colour at the V&A, London.) 1830 - 40.
Above: Iranian horse calligram, 1266/ 1849 - 50.
Above: I love that Bahram Gur is leaping into the composition in order to slay the dragon. A page from Khamseh, copied by "the slave Bihzad" in 898/1493. Before the days of colour copiers.
Above: last but not least, "The lion advised by his mother" from a Kalilah wa Dimnah, Syria (or Egypt) 755/ 1354.

AND....I am proud to announce that Sedonia is now stocking my greeting cards! Very exciting -- such an incredibly beautiful shop: yesterday I was in there for a mere ten minutes and I am still dreaming about the candy striped Ici et La deckchairs, mushroom shaped lamp and red clogs. Lucky citizens of Seddon!

Saturday, 5 February 2011

An illustration for Melbourne's Child

Until I was contacted by the editor of Melbourne's Child to ask whether I would like to contribute illustrations to the magazine, I didn't realise that the publication is actually Australia wide, and is familiar to those in respective states as "Sydney's Child", "Adelaide's Child" etc. Don't tell anyone, but I hadn't done editorial illustration since last century. And I think it shows, because my little girl is a bit -- well -- stiff. But I have since worked on a couple more illustrations which will appear in the subsequent issue, and I can report that I am happier with them.
Hopefully they will improve with each month. It's a nice challenge that I am lucky to have.
The illustration as it appears on the page, below. It's pretty small, which is good. Illustrations always look more impressive when they're reduced. Like on a's one of my dreams to illustrate a stamp one day. (Likely a pretty common and time honoured dream among illustrators!)

Wednesday, 2 February 2011

A knitted horned beast of some sort

Trying out a horned animal design that I made up yesterday. Even though there are all manner of such beasts in graphed form out there already, of course when I needed one I couldn't find a nice one in my books (or on the internet) so I made one up.
Here is the basis for my graph, from 5000 Animals, Amsterdam, 2001. (It's a great resource for both strange and wonderful copyright free animal engravings - thanks to my dear friend Serena!)
Not QUITE as adorable as the engraving is the finished graph. This was made in Illustrator by placing a transparent grid over the drawing and filling in each square. Because knitting stitches are actually wider than they are high, the grid should actually be made up of slightly squat rectangles. However my knitting must be so tight when I follow motifs that they don't need to be. That's my theory anyway.
Feel free to print and knit him if you like. Even better, if anyone out there could verify exactly what he is -- to me he seems neither moose nor deer - that would be great!